Chinese Gold Coins

1 Item(s)

per page

Grid  List 

1 Item(s)

per page

Grid  List 

Chinese Gold Coinage

The Chinese Gold Coins reveal a glimpse of authentic Chinese culture. 

Chinese World Expo Shanghai Gold Coin: The coin honors the 2010 World Expo held in Shanghai and represents Shanghai's new status in the 21st century as the next prominent world city. The obverse displays a colored World Expo logo with the earth in the background. Inscriptions include the Chinese characters for the People's Republic of China along with the year of mintage. 

China Qin Shi Huang Gold Coin: Qin Shi Huang was the first emperor of Mainland China and the founder of the Qin dynasty. The obverse features Qin Shi Huang along with the denomination. The reverse displays the year of mintage.

China Smithsonian Proof Gold Panda Medal: The obverse features the Smithsonian castle with the Great Wall of China along with the year of mintage. The reverse displays the pandas Tian Tian, Mei Xiang, Bao Bao, and Bei Bei. Inscriptions include weight and purity.

Interested in buying Chinese Silver Coins or Silver Chinese Pandas? Check this out! 

History of the Chinese Gold Mint

Bullion Exchanges is happy to offer the Chinese Gold Coins that has been manufacturing since Ancient times into the Modern Era. The China Banknote Printing and Minting Corporation was managed only by six facilities across China. Established in Beijing, Shanghai, Chengdu, Xi'an, Nanchang, and Shijiazhuang, the Chinese Mint transformed Gold into the valuable national coinage imported from Australia. China was the first nation to develop paper currency during the 9th century, many scholars believe the first banknotes originated on the Chinese mainland. In 1920, the Chinese Government organized the first National Mint facility in the city of Shanghai. Shortly after World War II, the Ministry of Finance began producing coins in 1933 and established Central Mint. In 1937, China's Nationalist Government, along with the Central Mint, relocated to several Chinese cities due to an invasion by Japan. Branches of the Central Mint surfaced in many Mainland Chinese cities, including Guilin, Kunming, Lanzhou, Chengdu, and Wuchang. By 1949, the Chinese Communist Government led by Mao gained control of the majority of the Central Mint Branches and continued to strike coins after the war. However, one of the Central Mint Branch followed the Nationalist Government to Taipei, Taiwan.

 

Chinese Gold Panda Coins 

Chinese Panda Gold coins are one of the most recognizable Gold coins from China. Gold Panda Coins are stunning. The Panda Coins feature a new design annually. Each year, the Giant Panda is starred in a new background scene. Chinese Gold Panda Coins are a big hit among collectors and investors since the Gold Coins are IRA eligible. People who are eager to diverse their investment portfolio frequently find these stunning Gold coins a great place to begin. Gold Pandas are backed by the Chinese government, and indeed are technically legal tender in China. 

The Design of China Gold Panda Coins

The designs on the Panda coins change annually, but it always features the beloved Giant Panda of China. The adorable Giant Panda is a widely popular endangered species native to Mainland China. Frequently, China minted Chinese Gold Panda coins in five denominations: 500, 200, 100, 50, and 20 yuan. The obverse of the Chinese Panda Gold Coins remains the same from year to year. The obverse highlights the Temple of Heaven was built in the year 1420. The Temple of Heaven is placed in Beijing and was often visited by emperors in previous dynasties for ceremonial prayers that were intended to bring about a good harvest. However, the Temple of Heaven was not available for public viewing until nearly 500 years later when it was given UNESCO World Heritage Status. The reverse of the coin changes annually displaying the Giant Panda design. Most of the reverse designs feature the Panda spending time in their natural environment. Along with the design, the reverse includes the weight of the Gold coin and the face value (Chinese Yuan).