Johnson Matthey

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About Johnson Matthey

Johnson Matthey was a notorious international refinery famous for the specific chemical techniques used in minting Johnson Matthey gold and silver bars and rounds, as well as platinum bars. This multinational corporation, which produced precious metals and chemicals, operated in over 30 countries under five divisions: precious metals, fine chemicals and catalysts, process technologies, emission control technologies, and new businesses. The company’s long history of excellence and sterling reputation made its products extremely valuable between investors and collectors, who are especially interested in the refineries coveted JM Silver bars, which stopped being minted in the 1980s. However, in 2014, the company intrigued its most dedicated fans by re-releasing its 10-ounce JM silver bullion bar. Johnson Matthey has since sold it's Gold and Silver refining business to Asahi Holdings, Inc.

The History of Johnson Matthey

The mint’s history began over 200 years ago in London when Percival Norton Johnson established his own precious metal assaying and refining company in 1817. Gaining experience at his father’s assaying business, Johnson started with refining Brazilian gold and quickly became popular thanks to his technique of enhancing the gold’s color through extracting palladium from it. The company became Johnson Matthey mint in 1851 when he partnered with George Matthey, a famous English stockbroker. Shortly after their partnership, Johnson Matthey became the official refinery and assayer of the Bank of England. In 1861, the mint became a limited company and thereafter it made its first appearance on London’s Stock Exchange in 1942. Johnson Matthey later became the first company to create catalytic converters, used for managing vehicle pollution, and won the Queen’s Technological Achievement Award for this innovation in 1976. Johnson Matthey silver bars were very appreciated and desired by investors and collectors during the 1970s and 1990s because their production didn’t cover the demand for the precious metals market. Later, the company stopped minting its own bullion and specialized in producing chemicals and catalysts, focusing on the use of eco-friendly technologies in order to minimize harmful emissions.

Johnson Matthey Bullion

This prestigious mint used to refine and distribute silver, gold, and platinum bullion of different size options, like its famous 1 oz., 10-oz. and 100-oz. bars. The company’s stamp is present on every authentic Johnson Matthey bar, represented by its initials “JM” depicted next to two crossed hammers. The stamp also contains the purity indicator and the bar’s weight. Most Johnson Matthey bars also have serial numbers stamped on them, usually if they were intended for being sold to commodity exchanges. The company stopped producing precious metals bullion, except for the 2014 re-release of the 10-ounce silver bar. Due to their scarcity, Johnson Matthey bullion has slightly higher prices than similar products produced by other mints.

If you have questions about Johnson Matthey bars, please do not hesitate to contact Bullion Exchanges at 800.852.6884. Our team members are also available online using our live chat feature, or via email at info@bullionexchanges.com.