Bullion Exchanges is proud to offer a variety of Chinese bullion coins and bars.  Although the Chinese Mint is primarily known for its Gold Panda Coins and the Gold Lunar Series coins, it produces many other products such as the popular Silver Panda coins. Many of the Silver Panda coins are rare finds today and are sadly often subject to counterfeit. Today, Bullion Exchanges now carries three of the rarest Silver Panda coins ever: the very first three Silver Pandas ever released.

History of Gold and Silver in China

China has a rich and extensive history regarding gold production and trade. As early as the third millennium (BCE), gold mining became a common practice in Western China. Starting during the days of the Han Dynasty (206 BCE – 220 CE) Eastern China traded items along the Silk Road such as tea, silk, and dyes to the West in exchange for precious gold and silver. Gold coins and gold bars from China have been a hot commodity since those early days of trade.

Gold and Silver Panda Coins

In the 1980s, the China Mint set out to begin its modern bullion coin series. Every year, since 1982, China has struck Panda coins with new annual reverse designs. In 1983, the first-ever silver panda coin was created. Every year following, there is a strict one-year-only design, making the Silver Panda coins highly collectible. The only exceptions include 1986 and 1988, where no Silver Pandas were struck, and 2001-2002. During that time, the China Mint kept the same design and collectors internationally expressed their widespread criticism of this decision. Ultimately, the China Mint continued to strike new variations every year since.  

In the beginning, the 1983-1985 Silver Panda coins had a purity of .90 pure silver with a weight of 27g—almost 1 troy oz. In 1987, the mint corrected this weight and purity to .999 pure silver and 1 troy ounce. However, in 2016 the Panda coins began being minted in 30-gram sizes only to appeal to international investors. Also, in 1989, the first BU edition of the Silver Panda coin was released. Additionally, the proof Silver Pandas began to have a P mintmark featured on them. 

When buying modern silver bullion coins, it is worth noting that even if a silver coin is encapsulated, it can develop “milky spots”. The reason for this is theorized to be because the round disks struck into the coins are washed after production. These are washed in order to remove any contaminants for a brighter planchet. If not fully rinsed, it is theorized that particles from the cleaning solution could potentially cause white spots to blossom ins silver coins over time. It is not something that can be entirely avoided, nor is it something that can be predicted.

The First Three Silver Panda Coins

1983 Silver Panda Coin

The 1983 Silver Panda coin is one of the rarest Silver Pandas of all. This coin was the first-ever release with an extremely limited mintage of 10,000. This Silver Panda was designed by prolific coin designer Yu Min. The 1983 Silver Pandas also received the Best Silver Coin of the Year in 1983. Finally, even though this coin has an NGC grade of PF 68, this coin’s average grading was 67. That makes this coin above-average, and a fantastic edition to have for your collection!

1983 27 gram Chinese Silver Panda 10 Yuan NGC PF 68 UCAM Bullion Exchanges

Coin Specifications:

  • First-year of issue
  • Limited mintage of 10,000
  • Proof Finish
  • Won Best Silver Coin of the Year in 1983
  • Graded NGC PF 68 Ultra-Cameo
  • Made with .900 fine silver and weighs 27 grams
  • Face value of 10 Yuans backed by the Republic of China
  • Obverse: Highlights the Hall of Prayers national landmark. Inscriptions: Above the temple design is the kanji “中华人民共和国” (People’s Republic of China), and below it is the year of mintage.
  • Reverse: Showcases a panda cub and its parent relaxing in a clearing. The adult panda holds a bamboo shoot in its paws while the cub watches. Inscriptions: “10 元” (10 Yuan).

1984 Silver Panda Coin

The 1984 Silver Pandas are the second release in the Silver Panda series. Xie Lie is the designer of these particular coins, which makes her the first woman to design the Silver Pandas. Because these coins are so beautifully simplistic, they are highly subject to counterfeiting. Therefore, we recommend you only purchase graded versions from reputable dealers like Bullion Exchanges.

1984 27 gram Chinese Silver Panda 10 Yuan NGC PF 68 UCAM Bullion Exchanges

Coin Specifications:

  • Limited mintage of 10,000
  • Graded NGC PF 68 Ultra-Cameo
  • Made with .900 fine silver and weighs 27 grams
  • Proof finish
  • Face Value of 10 Yuans backed by the Republic of China
  • Obverse: Displays the Hall of Prayers, a national landmark. Inscriptions: Above the temple design is the kanji “中华人民共和国” (People’s Republic of China), and below it is the year of mintage.
  • Reverse: A parent and a cub are together among bamboo foliage. The sitting cub holds a bamboo shoot and the parent watches its cub. Inscriptions: “10 元” (10 Yuan).

1985 Silver Panda Coin

The 1985 Silver Panda was also illustrated by Xie Lie. This coin just about matches the rarity of the 1983 Silver Panda coin. Again, because of its lovely simplicity, the coin is also more likely to be counterfeited. You can avoid falling victim to counterfeits when you purchase graded versions of these coins from reputable dealers only.

1985 27 gram Chinese Silver Panda 10 Yuan NGC PF 69 UCAM Bullion Exchanges

Coin Specifications:

  • Limited mintage of 10,000
  • Graded NGC PF 69 Ultra-Cameo
  • Proof finish
  • Made with .900 fine silver and weighs about 27 grams
  • Face Value of 10 Yuans backed by the Republic of China
  • Obverse: Displays the national landmark, the Hall of Prayers. Inscriptions: Above the temple design is the kanji “中华人民共和国” (People’s Republic of China), and below it is the year of mintage.
  • Reverse: A parent panda walks through the woods with its cub on its back. Inscriptions: “10 元” (10 Yuans).

The People’s Republic of China Mint

The China Mint has struck incredible bullion coins since its first commemorative coin release in 1979. Their designs are among the most famous in the bullion coin industry. Despite inconsistent beginnings, the China Mint’s Silver Panda coins continue to be among the most popular in the world. The Gold Pandas in particular are also among the most prized bullion coins ever. On top of that, the China Mint also produces gold and silver bars that feature some of the most unique designs in the industry. 

Your Trusted Precious Metals Dealer

Bullion Exchanges sells world expo coins and Chinese commemorative gold coins and medals. For example, we carry the rare 2016 10 oz Silver Chinese Panda Moon Festival Proof Medal NGC Gem PF. We also possess a variety of unique Chinese gold bars, and of course, the Gold and Silver Panda coins. Diversify your portfolio with the incredibly valuable China Mint Panda coins.

Bullion Exchanges is a top-rated, trusted, and accredited retailer in Manhattan. When you purchase from us, you can rest assured that we will securely package and ship your order to your address. If you have any questions, please contact us during our business hours and we will be happy to assist you!

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